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Today's Features

  • Despite the financial challenges facing the U.S. Postal Service, the Owenton Post Office continues to deliver top-quality service.

    In a recent Gallup Organization Survey, USPS customers gave the facility high marks for efficiency, accuracy of delivery, consistency of delivery and wait-time in line.

  • Rotary Awards

    Sixth Grade

    Michael Ashcraft and Brittany Thornton

    Seventh Grade

    Gabe Osborne and Brittany Schaub

    Eighth Grade

    Corey Cobb and Felicia Neal

    Perfect Attendance

    Ben Allen, Allison Dempsey, Cody Downey, Brady Glacken, Autumn Gover, Willie Johnson, Annie Juett, Hannah McCormick, Charles Moloney, Kristen Mygra, Tiffany Ohmer, Victor Perez, Talmon Shidecker, Kayleigh Shaw, Brandon Slusher, Corby Smith, Brooklyn Smither, Richie Swigert, Tyler True, Sarah Wotier

  • During the early years,  drinking, gambling, and even dancing were infractions that resulted in exclusion from fellowship at the Poplar Grove Baptist Church; though many of the congregants were reinstated after repenting from their “wayward ways.”

  • Songs have always been part of America’s heritage and the people who settled Owen County brought with them the music and songs from Virginia and the Carolinas. Some of these songs were originally composed in Europe and sang on the ships traveling to America.

  • Garnett, Anderson, Tolliver, Bond, Alexander, Samuels, Monday ...

    These are a few of the names of families who lived on Two Mile in and around the 1930s.

    The children gathered in New Liberty June 13 to celebrate their beginnings and to renew old acquaintances.

    A history-making event, over 150 people were in attendance from several states including Michigan, Virginia, Maryland, Ohio, Indiana and Kentucky.

    The event was spearheaded by Claude Garnett, whose parents and grandparents resided on Two Mile when he was a child.

  • Throughout the past year, colorful quilt squares have popped up all over on Owen County barns, signs and even one restaurant. Many are curious, but few know the rich history behind the farms and the patterns that adorn the individual barns.

    The Owen County Extension Homemakers have spent many hours researching and preserving the history of various quilt patterns. Their latest effort is a 50-page book containing information about each quilt square in Owen County.

  • Purchasing a class ring is often a monumental time in a high school student’s life. Worn as a symbol of pride for achieving goals in high school, it is a keepsake that provides many with remembrance of youthful days gone by.

    Two years ago, a letter was mailed to Owen County High School along with a 1958 OCHS class ring from McAuley High School in Cincinnati, Ohio.

    The letter read, “The enclosed ring was found in our old, old lost and found. Hope you can find the owner.”

  • When you walk into the Sweet Owen Store, it’s like taking a step back in time. Rocking chairs circle the potbelly stove, jars filled with old-fashioned candies sit near the cash register, bean soup and cornbread are served and the owners greet you with a smile. With a completely revamped look and new owners, the Sweet Owen Store is back and open for business.

    Owners Tom and Reggie Taggart opened the new Sweet Owen Store June 4. Breakfast and lunch are served daily and basic groceries – such as milk, bread and cold drinks – are sold.

  • On May 25, 15 Owen County High School seniors and their three chaperones ventured to the theater district of New York City on the third-annual senior drama class field trip.

    During their stay, students explored Times Square, Rockefeller Plaza, NBC Studios, Madam Tussauds Wax Museum, Fifth Avenue and 34th Street fashion districts, the Empire State Building, the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, the Statue of Liberty, Battery Park, Ground Zero, Wall Street, Financial District, Little Italy and Chinatown.

  • Most people just call her Miss Della, but after last week she can be called Dr. Jones.

    Della Jones, Grant County’s oldest resident at 105 years young – soon to be 106 in July – was given an honorary doctorate degree from Kentucky State University.

    “Do you want to wear a robe?” she was asked of the traditional graduation attire.

    “Well, of course,” she was quick to reply.