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Today's Features

  • Rate hike announced by electricity provider
    Jan. 19, 2011
    5 years ago

    The Kentucky Public Service commission recently granted a rate increase to Winchester-based East Kentucky Power Cooperative, the wholesale electric power supplier for Owen Electric Cooperative and 15 other member cooperatives.

    According to a statement released by the company, EKPC sought the rate increase to “strengthen its financial condition and continue building equity.”

  • Romeo and Juliet, Cleopatra and Marc Anthony, Robin Hood and Lady Marion, Scarlett O’Hara and Rhett Butler. Love stories, some historic, others fictional, have always ignited the imagination, captured the heart and survived the test of time.

    Family love stories have entertained Owen countians for generations. Some create poignant memories of long ago, while others elicit skepticism at the thought of Papaw in the role of Romeo.

  • BY ROGER ALFORD
    N-H Columnist

    Will Rogers, the humorist from a generation ago, said lots of funny things in his day, including this ditty:

    “When I die, I want to go peacefully in my sleep like Grandpa did. Not screaming like all the passengers in his car.”

  • Recently I spent time with some people who are homeless.

    I had met some of them while tagging along at the annual county-wide housing count, which is another way to say homeless count.

    Every year, people who care go out and find the people who live in the woods or in their cars or sleep in abandoned buildings and get as much information about them as they can.

    People who care want to meet these people’s immediate and ongoing needs with tents and blankets and stoves, and also their long-term needs.

  • Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church

    “I Am Not Alone” was Carla Marston’s special in song Sunday morning.  The choir also sang “Worthy of Worship.”  Bro. Dale’s sermon was based on 2 Corinthians 4:1-12. 

    Thanks to everyone who made our “Super Bowl of Chili and Soup” a success!  All had a great time in fellowship.

  • Author and storyteller Phyllis Theroux once wrote, “To send a letter is a good way to go somewhere without moving anything but your heart.”

    Letters presented opportunities to share with others significant pieces of a person’s life.

    After the Revolutionary War, Americans became part of the great westward expansion into Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois and beyond.

    As families and friends were left behind, letters sent back home provided a bridge between the old life and the new.

  • Famous French poet and novelist, Victor Hugo, once wrote “Laughter is the sun that drives winter from the human face.”

    Hugo was very perceptive, for it is laughter that binds families and communities together and creates special moments in life.

    Owen countians are natural-born storytellers, and as they relate an amusing incident, at times accompanied by a bit of blarney, their eyes light up, and their soft chuckles explode into loud hearty guffaws of laughter.

  • As he cradled the concertina and coaxed it to sing, the strains of “Rosin The Bow” gallantly galloped across its pleated folds, and for one brief moment in time, the melodious instrument captured a piece of history.

    Brother Matt Merrill, his passion for history lighting up his bearded countenance, was the historical society’s special guest speaker last week.

    Matt is pastor of First Methodist in Owenton, a history teacher in Woodford county, a former historical reenactor, and a delightfully informative scholar of the Civil War.

  • “Dogs are not our whole life, but they make our lives whole.” -- Roger Caras, author/photographer

    Though a bit blurry, the photo creates a poignant image of a man and his dog. Taken prior to his tragic death in 1947, William Duvall and Butch share a special moment together in a typical Owen County farm scene.

    William and Butch were inseparable until William died in 1947. When William was crushed between a truck and scantling at one of his barns, Butch tried to sound an alarm by constantly barking, but to no avail.

  • After the treaty of Versailles was signed in 1919, officially ending World War I, Owen countians looked forward to putting war memories behind them, and retuning to a life of normalcy.

    Though most folks in Owen County were more concerned with local happenings, remarkable events occurred across the country in 1919.

    On Jan. 15, 1919, 2.5 million gallons of hot crude molasses flooded the streets of Boston, taking the lives of 21 people.