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Today's Features

  • We had bridge on Tuesday at the Smith House. I was the designated hostess this week. As I was going in with my very large beach bag of stuff for the bridge game, I saw Jackie Allnutt just in front of me. I hadn’t seen her since the Owenton High School reunion. We stood blocking the door and talked till she found her friends and went to sit down.

  • History is an account of events in either a written or narrative form. But what makes history exciting is the character of the people involved who enhance those events with their own personality, adding a dimension of life, color and movement.
    Owen countians have always been intrinsically intertwined with the past, and many have recorded their hopes, dreams and sorrows in diaries and books or have passed them down in family stories.

  • We finally got some soaking rain. There was something over an inch of rain in the gauge Monday morning and it is still sprinkling lightly.
    I know it rained on someone’s parade being a holiday weekend, but it was well received here on the Branch.

  • Rusty and Heidi Williams have announced the upcoming marriage of their daughter Kelsey Layne to Robert Stephen Wilson, son of Stephen and Mary Wilson. The wedding will take place at 6:30 p.m., Saturday, Sept. 15, 2012, at 475 Cull Road, the home of Rusty and Heidi Williams. Dinner and dancing will be held immediately following the ceremony. All family and friends are invited, but please RSVP at www.kelseyandrobert12.ourwedding.com.

  • The weekend was great for outdoor sports, projects and just sitting and admiring it. The barn martins have flown. My two humming birds are still here, but evidently they didn’t reproduce because there has been no new birds at the feeder.
    I saw a field of tobacco that had been cut as I was going to Owenton last week.
    Fay brought me corn and tomatoes at midweek. I processed it and froze it for John’s birthday supper. When I was talking to her this morning she said all their corn was gone but she still had green beans and tomatoes.

  • I never knew you. Your name has always eluded me. Mama and Papa never mentioned you, but perhaps they were too busy making a living on the farm in Owen county. I’m sure you knew how much work it was to put in a crop of tobacco. In March or April seed was sown in the burned plant beds. Transplanting was done in May or June and the whole family worked together as the kids carefully dropped plants in rows and the adults set them. Work continued as the fragile plants were carefully cultivated with plows, hoes, and by hand.

  •  The tall grasses of Kentucky gave way to the mighty bison. These great shaggy beasts created trails leading to the salt licks and rivers that dotted the land. Trails that were further defined by the moccasin feet of the American Indian.
    In 1775, Daniel Boone and 30 men completed the first trail through the Cumberland Mountains. It moved through the Alleghenies at Cumberland Gap, at what is now the junction of the state boundaries of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Virginia. Heading northwest, it split at Hazel Patch, one route creating Boonesborough, the other Frankfort.

  • The big 127 Yard Sale is over. Wanda said they had a big sale at her house.
    Vanessa’s husband Willis’ mother passed away recently and they have been cleaning out her house, so they had a lot of stuff to sell. She and Barbara helped them set up and sell things as well as the stuff they brought.
    She said they survived heat, rain and wind but made it through the weekend.
    Charles Gregory and his friend Billy Kemper cooked and sold food as they have done for several years now.