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Today's Features

  • Members of the Council for Burley Tobacco elected two representatives to the Board of Directors at the 2016 Council for Burley Tobacco Annual Meeting, January 16, in Owensboro, Kentucky.

    The two members elected to represent the Growers-at-Large for the organization are David Chappell from Sparta, Kentucky and Hampton Henton from Versailles, Kentucky. Chappell and Henton will join Greg Harris from Richmond, Kentucky; Rod Kuegel from Owensboro, Kentucky; Donald Mitchell from Midway, Kentucky and Al Pedigo from Scottsville, Kentucky as the Grower-at Large board members.

  • Author and storyteller Phyllis Theroux once wrote, “To send a letter is a good way to go somewhere without moving anything but your heart.”

    Letters presented opportunities to share with others significant pieces of a person’s life.

    After the Revolutionary War, Americans became part of the great westward expansion into Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois and beyond.

    As families and friends were left behind, letters sent back home provided a bridge between the old life and the new.

  • The big news this week is the fire in Lexington.

    You are thinking, “Why should that concern Kay’s Branch?”

    Jimmy Lawrence called me about 6 p.m. Saturday night to ask me if I had heard about the “big fire” in Lexington. It’s on all the stations up there, but he couldn’t get it where he lives in northern Kentucky.

  • BY ROGER ALFORD
    N-H Columnist

    Some anonymous wise guy took to the Internet to discuss the economy, saying it’s so bad that:

  • When someone says, “I have good news and bad news,” which one do you prefer to hear first?

    Joe went to his doctor who posed that question to him.

    “Give me the good news first,” Joe said.

    “You have 24 hours to live,” the doctor told him.

    Clutching his chest, Joe said, “If that’s the good news, what’s the bad news?”

    The doctor said, “I meant to tell you yesterday.”

    Ba dump bump. (Groan.)

  • Monterey Baptist Church

    We collected more than 35 pairs of new tennis shoes for the schools! Way to go, MBC!

    If there is no school on a Wednesday, then Rock Stars will not meet Wednesday evening.

    The youth meet on Sunday nights at 5 p.m.

    Our church has a volleyball team. They play at the gym at First Baptist Church in Owenton. They play at 8:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 8, at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 15 and at 8:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 22. Come out and support our team!

  • BY JENEEN WICHE
    Weekend Gardener

    Up until recently our mild winter has seen little snow. Snow has an insulating effect which is particularly useful when we have frigid temperatures, otherwise it can be a joy to snow lovers and a nuisance to those who would rather be “snow birds.”

    Ground level snow will actually protect the roots and crowns of perennial and woody plants, but you may notice a little burn above the snow level when it comes to broadleaf evergreens.

  • The three most important things you can do to protect livestock in cold weather are providing sufficient water, giving ample high-quality feed and offering weather protection. Cold stress reduces livestock productivity, including rate of gain, milk production and reproductive difficulty, and can cause disease problems.

  • Wet-dry petition making rounds
    Five years ago
    Jan. 26, 2011

    A petition for a wet/dry vote in Owen County recently began circulating, which Owen County Clerk Joan Kincaid said could lead to a costly special election.

    The petition asks if Owen contains would be in favor of the sale of alcoholic beverages in Owen County.

    Kincaid said in order for a special election to be held, a total of 901 registered Owen County voters would need to sign the petition, 25 percent of voters in the last general election.

  • Famous French poet and novelist, Victor Hugo, once wrote “Laughter is the sun that drives winter from the human face.”

    Hugo was very perceptive, for it is laughter that binds families and communities together and creates special moments in life.

    Owen countians are natural-born storytellers, and as they relate an amusing incident, at times accompanied by a bit of blarney, their eyes light up, and their soft chuckles explode into loud hearty guffaws of laughter.