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Today's Features

  • During the War of 1812, 63-year-old Kentucky Governor Isaac Shelby personally led the Kentucky militia into battle against the British and their Indian allies.
    Early in the war, Kentuckians  had suffered a great defeat and massacre at the hands of the British and Indians on the banks of the Raisin River.

  • After five and a half years of waiting, Robby and Kristi Adkins of Jonesville happily announce the adoption of their 17-month old daughter, Mercy Mei Janey Adkins. Her sister Autumn eagerly anticipated Christmas morning with her new sibling. The entire family is thankful to all friends and family who’ve prayed for them during this lengthy process.

  • I had a very good Christmas. The week preceding was kind of hectic but that’s to be expected. I had gone to Frankfort Tuesday to do the shopping and get gas, so I would have the rest of the week to stay at home and do the last-minute wrapping, make candy and clean.
    It wasn’t to be.
    June Stokley called Tuesday night to ask if I could play dominos on Wednesday. Now I should have said no but one must have their priorities straight. So I went to Garden Point to play dominos on Wednesday.

  • Elizabeth Reed and Aaron Smither were wed at 6:30 P.M. on Aug. 27, 2011 at St. Dominic Church in Springfield.
     Elizabeth is the daughter of John Boyd and Patricia Reed of Springfield.
     Aaron is the son of Maurice Ray and Norma (Estes) Smither of Lexington.
     The ceremony was performed by Father Pepper and Father Brown.

  • “A knowledge of the past prepares us for the crisis of the present and the challenge of the future.”
    These words of President John F. Kennedy are a poignant reminder of the vital necessity to preserve the history of our nation, our state, our community, and our families. Artifacts, stories, and documents of our ancestors serve as a bridge connecting us to our past.

  • Misty Stewart and Daven Lynch are proud to announce the birth of their daughter, Brailey Dawn born Dec. 6, 2011. She weighed 8 lb. 1 oz. and was 20 1/2 inches long.
    Grandparents are Johnny and Sarah Stewart of Owenton, Ozzie Wright and Tina Lynch of Sanders and Greg Lynch of Carrollton. Her great-grandparents are Charles and Tillie Stewart of New Liberty and Charles Bitzer of Owenton. Her great-great-grandparent is Boliver Baker of Ohio.

  • The new light looked so good I decided to go a step further and see about putting new vinyl siding on the house. I was pointing toward spring, but thought I would get a couple of estimates. Before I knew what was happening, I had a salesman here from Sears and had contracted for the job. I chose a sage green with white trim and was still thinking they wouldn’t start until maybe March. Oh no, the salesman said, they will begin in a couple of weeks.
    I thought the man was crazy - ripping off the siding of my house in December and working with vinyl in 35-degree weather.

  • I’ve had a very good week, even though my house looks like a Christmas factory has exploded inside of it. I’ve gotten a little bit done in every room but nothing is finished, ergo, the guest bedroom looks like it’s packing to leave for parts unknown.
    The orange and brown has been packed away and the red and green laid out to be hung, arranged or placed strategically on tables, mantle or anything that doesn’t move.

  • Even into the 20th century, Owen countians were not immune to the “speckled monster.” 
    It attacked young and old alike, and many did not survive its devastating assault. Through the 18th and 19th centuries, pioneer villages and towns were decimated by its onslaught, and many succumbed to the effects of this dreaded disease called smallpox.
    Owen County records show that in December of 1902 a smallpox epidemic was raging in the area, and many died as it made its way from household to household.