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Today's Features

  • The Owen County High School chapter of the National Honor Society sponsored fund-raising activities to support the WHAS Crusade for Children, which is coordinated by local fire departments. A chili supper was held Feb. 14 that raised $156, and Hometown Pizza contributed a percentage of total sales for March 23 raising $93.42, for a total contribution of $249.42. Officers of NHS presented Owenton Fire Chief David Lilly and Owen County Fire Chief Robb Chaney with a check for the money that was raised.

  • I really enjoyed the warm days last week. I got the mowing finished and finally got to play golf.
    I know a lot of people got some gardening done. Ann and Tutt got their tomatoes planted, and Wanda helped Charlie a little in his garden. She said this was the latest he’d every gotten things in the ground.
    All the corn and tobacco fields that were plowed early will have to be rebroken. All the rain has melted the ground right back into solid earth again.

  • She discovered the old picture in her mother’s closet, but no one seemed to know the identity of the distinguished looking man. It was surmised that he was an Owen countian and the picture had a date of 1867 penciled on the back. Historical society member Christina Rice hung the picture in her home and every time she passed it she would ask, “Who are you?” Knowing he was related to her, Christina was determined to solve the mystery of his identity.

  • Canby Tabernacle
    Canby Tabernacle is hosting vacation Bible school for ages 5-15 next week from 6:30 to 9 p.m. July 25 through July 29.
    For information, call (502) 484-0316.

    Elk Lick Baptist

  • Jeffrey Peak was honored as a new CPA at the Kentucky Society of Certified Public Accountants Spring Awards Banquet April 11. The oath of Kentucky CPA was administered by Cheryl Laloned. Peak is the son of Gregg and Suzanne Peak of Owenton; the grandson of Jesse and Evelyn Bourne of Owenton; and the grandson of Hugh and Mable Peak of Shelbyville.
     

  • Sarah Peak, center, was recognized at the University Scholars Assembly of Eastern Kentucky University April 8 for the top award in the outstanding graduate thesis category. Also pictured are Dr. Jerry Pogatshnik, left, dean of the graduate school, and Dr. Nathan Tice, right, her thesis adviser. She is the daughter of Gregg and Suzanne Peak of Owenton; the granddaughter of Jesse and Evelyn Bourne of Owenton; and the granddaughter of Hugh and Mable Peak of Shelbyville.

  • Tom and Sonya Antrobus of Falmouth and Bryan and Tammy Woodyard of Astor, Fla., are pleased to announce the engagement and forthcoming marriage of their daughter, Brandi Kay Antrobus, to Adam Tyler Gaines, son of Donette and Charlie Gaines of Owenton.
    The wedding is being planned for 6:30 p.m. May 21 at Trinity Southern Baptist. A reception will follow at Stonewood Gardens.
    The bride is a 2006 graduate of Grant County High School and is presently attending Northern Kentucky University. She is employed by the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

  • Foods containing antioxidants can boost a person’s immunity and go a long way in preventing disease.
    Antioxidants are vitamins, minerals and other compounds in food that protect cells in the body from damage by compounds called free radicals. Free radicals occur naturally when the body breaks down food or when it is exposed to tobacco smoke or radiation. Free radicals may play a role in heart disease, cancer, and other diseases.

  • Derby weekend was a whopping success. Oh, it rained on Wednesday and the boat race had to be postponed; or was that Tuesday? It rains so much lately I loose track, but Friday was a beautiful day for the Oaks; and though it was cloudy and cool most of Saturday, the small amount of rain that fell at mid-afternoon didn’t hurt the track or the crowd’s enthusiasm.

  • Though most Owen countians know someone by the name of Elizabeth or Margaret, many may not realize that at one time these were the names of two communities in the county. While examining old copies of the News-Herald, Doris Riley — a historical society member, historian, and genealogist — discovered Margaret and Elizabeth in the “Community News.” Elizabeth was somewhere around Lusby’s Mill, but Margaret seems to be lost somewhere in the past, her whereabouts unknown.