Today's Features

  • Staci and Nick Thrasher would like to announce the birth of their daughter, Haleigh Jo. She was born June 21, 2011, at University of Kentucky Medical Center, and she was 6 pounds, 14.7 ounces and 19.5 inches long.

  • We had a heavy frost Sunday morning. It was 31 degrees when I got up. It always frosts first at my house. I live in a valley. I did bring in the plants I had outside and saved them. The leaves on the sycamore tree are falling in bunches.
    They started on Joel’s new building at Earthtools last week. Some of the framing of the sides are in place. If they have good weather this week, it should be under roof by Friday. They work pretty fast once they get started.

  • Owen countians have always experienced new beginnings. The first settlers traveled to the area by way of the Cumberland Gap, literally hacking their way through the dense forests. Some were killed by Indians, others suffered from starvation, cold and disease. Yet their desire for a new beginning and a better life strengthened their resolve.

  • The melodies of a riverboat calliope drifted through downtown Owenton Sunday as dozens showed up to take their first look at the Kentucky River Room at the Owen County Historical Society Museum.
    The calliope was once housed in the Cincinnati Museum Center, the vice president of the center, Dr. Tonya Matthews, said.
    “The calliope was donated to our center a few years ago from a family where the father had been very interested in steam boats and calliopes,” Matthews said. “It was time to find a new home for some of that material and the museum center agreed to look for a home for it.”

  • Cedar Hill Baptist
    Bro. Bill’s morning message was from Matthew 18:12-14. Which sheep are we? Are we the one gone astray? What distractions have we bought into that pulled us away from Christ. Are we one of the 99? If we are, we need to take account of those gone astray and reach out to them. Are we the lost sheep that does not see a need for Christ? Jesus Christ wants to embrace us. He seeks continually to love us.

  • Together with their families, Alicia Stigers and Michael Shuler would like to announce their engagement and forthcoming marriage.
    Alicia is a 2008 graduate of Owen County High School who currently attends KCTCS majoring in criminal justice and is employed at the Carroll County Detention Center in Carrollton.
    Michael is a 2007 graduate from Owen County High School and is currently employed with Dana Manufacturing in Dry Ridge.
    The wedding is planned for 5 p.m. Oct. 8, 2011, at Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church in Owenton.

  • Scott and Tracy Allnutt wish to announce the upcoming marriage of their daughter, Brittany Taylor Allnutt, to James Philip (JP) Cook, son of Phil Cook and Teri Cook.
    Brittany is a 2006 graduate of Owen County High School and is employed with Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.
    JP is employed with Woodford Feed Store in Versailles.
    The wedding will take place at 6 p.m. Oct. 15, 2011, at the Owen County Fairgrounds. In case of rain the wedding will be held in the exhibit building. Invitations were sent to out-of-town guests only.

  • Fall is officially here. It says so on the calendar. Most of last week felt more like November than late September.
    Golf was called off Wednesday due to the rain. I kept waiting for the promised sun to come back all day Thursday and Friday. I just couldn’t make myself get out in the rain and get my shopping done.

  • In the state of Kentucky, we have 52 state parks. Each state park offers a different view of the treasures in our state. There are few sights more spectacular than the changing of the colors of the leaves in the fall. What a great time to get outside and observe the beauty of our state and get some physical activity, too.
    There are more than 300 miles of trails and they are for all types of hikers. There are easy and moderate trails, such as the half-mile, self-guided trail at the Columbus-Belmont State Park.

  • Wagons have always played an important part in the history of Owen County. After the long hunters made their trek over the Appalachian Mountains and claimed land in Kentucky, they returned home (most often to Carolina or Virginia) and brought their families to this wilderness. The rich, fertile land of Kentucky was considered to be a paradise on earth. According to T.A. Perry, the first entries claiming land in what is now Owen County were filed in the Virginia Land Offices in 1780.