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Today's Features

  • 5 years ago
    June 20, 2012
    Walking for life

    Dozens of friends, family, and members of the community lined the track at Itron Field to cheer on the survivors during their first lap at Friday’s Relay for Life.
    As the sun rose 12 hours later, a little over $46,000 had been raised and donations continue to pour into his week.

  • They migrated across the Appalachian mountains to Kentucky. Most hailed from Virginia, Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Families and friends traveled together, and upon their arrival to a new land, they built homes, churches, schools and communities. Groceries, blacksmith shops and other businesses settled in these small towns that dotted the landscape of Kentucky in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; and communities, fueled by the efforts of close-knit and self-reliant people, grew and prospered.

  • Father’s Day weekend was celebrated in the Traylor family with the arrival of Ellis James Traylor. Ray is a first-time grandfather, and his son Todd is a new father. Mother and son are doing just fine. Congratulations to the new parents.

  • By Roger Alford

    N-H Columnist

  • by Letha Lowe
    Pray Owen County

  • Editor’s note: Due to an email glitch, The News-Herald may not have received your church news this week. We apologize to any church that may have been omitted.

  • 5 years ago
    June 13, 2012
    Son keeps his father’s legacy alive with Relay

  • Cattle Receipts: 424
    May 31, 2017: 359
    Last year: 348

    Compared to last week: Feeder steers and heifers sold $3-$5 higher. Slaughter cows steady, bulls $1 higher.

    Feeders: 384
    Slaughter: 28
    Replacement: 2

    The feeder supply included 47.2 percent steers, 31.8 percent heifers and 11.9 percent bulls. Near 37 percent of the run weighed over 600 lbs.

  • He was only 16, but a war was being fought, and in the 1860s his manhood was never questioned. He was born in Owenton, Ky., raised by his grandmother, and eventually was apprenticed as a cabinetmaker in Wheatley.
    When the Civil War touched Owen County, J.C. Hartsough joined the Confederate Army and became a soldier of the Orphan Brigade. Though Kentucky claimed neutrality at the beginning of the war, loyalties were divided throughout the state, and most Owen countians eventually chose to fight for the Southern cause.

  • Hay, hay and more hay — and I do mean the kind one feeds to the stock. Everybody in the area is rushing to get their hay cut, dried and baled before it rains. Ray got his cut and stored for the coming winter last week. Fay said they were planning to get theirs finished the first of this week. I have seen large rolls of hay on all the fields from Frankfort to Owenton. That’s about the only road I travel anymore.
    I got my hard mowed Saturday, so now we will have a drought. After all the rain we’ve had this spring, it’s bound to happen.