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Today's Features

  • After the treaty of Versailles was signed in 1919, officially ending World War I, Owen countians looked forward to putting war memories behind them, and retuning to a life of normalcy.

    Though most folks in Owen County were more concerned with local happenings, remarkable events occurred across the country in 1919.

    On Jan. 15, 1919, 2.5 million gallons of hot crude molasses flooded the streets of Boston, taking the lives of 21 people.

  • The new year is off in a long run.

    I watched the ball drop along with Wanda and Ray, not in the same house, but you know what I mean.

    It was less than thrilling, so I went to bed and didn’t start my new year till 8:20 the next morning. The sun was out. That is news worthy because it hadn’t shown for over a week.

  • BY ROGER ALFORD
    N-H Columnist

    A redneck making his first skydive was falling through the air, unable to get his parachute to open. Try as he might, it wasn’t budging. In a panic, he yelled to a fellow who was flying up toward him: “Hey buddy, do do you know anything about parachutes?”

    “No,” the fellow responded. “Do you know anything about propane stoves?”

  • The last time we visited the church we like in Tampa, the pastor’s message was titled, “Let’s Eat Grandma — the Importance of Punctuation.”

    My first reaction was, “Hmmm. Punctuation? Really?”

    He spoke about commas.

    I’m a word person and I know a little bit about grammar and punctuation, although not much. And commas always throw me off.

  • Monterey Baptist Church

    We are back on schedule after the holidays. Bible study and Rock Stars meet at 7 p.m. on Wednesdays.

    The deacons will meet at 8 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 6.

    There will be a baby shower for Shelby Carter at 4 p.m., Sunday, Jan. 10 at the church. Shelby is having a boy and is registered at Wal-Mart and Babies R’ Us.

    The ladies fellowship will be at 9 a.m., Saturday, Jan. 16. Please come and bring a friend!

  • It has been said that volunteer firefighters are unpaid not because they are worthless, but because they are priceless.

    Up until the 1800s, fighting fires was done by volunteers, and fire equipment was rudimentary.

    In colonial towns, fire buckets had the owners name painted on them, and laws required town residents to purchase their own buckets and keep them repaired.

  •  Well, It’s all over but the rain. Wanda said the Halls had moved into their new home. Randell told her it hadn’t been easy because of all the rain and mud, getting the foundation ready, but he managed and they made it by Christmas. I am sure they are happy to be out of the small camper they had been living in. Landscaping will have to wait till spring. 

  • ROGER ALFORD
    N-H Columnist

     Fifteen minutes into a flight from Atlanta to Los Angeles, the captain announced, “Ladies and gentlemen, one of our engines has failed. There is nothing to worry about. Our flight will take a half hour longer than scheduled, but we still have three engines left.”

  • Editor’s note: Nancy Kennedy is taking a break for the holidays. This column first ran in 2011.

    I have been blessed with a terrible memory.

    It’s a blessing because I don’t remember things that haunt other people with better memories. I can’t remember most of the fights I’ve had with my husband or kids, or hurtful things people have said or done.

  • Elk Lick Baptist Church

    The sermon for the fourth Sunday of Advent was titled “For God So Loved Us.” Bonnie Glass and Hannah Adams lit the candle of hope and expectation. Ashley and Sarah Young lit the candle of joy. The Perkins family lit the candle of love. Jesus gives us hope and expectation.

    Bonnie Woodyard sang “Mary, Did You Know?” while Louise Johnson sang the “Twelve Days of Christmas.”

    Happy birthday to William Paul Elliston and William Gage Elliston.