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Today's Features

  • One of the best illustrations of an overinflated ego is in the story about the woodpecker that perched itself on a mighty oak tree, reared back and took a whack just as a bolt of lightning hit the trunk. The tree split from top to bottom and splinters flew in every direction. The woodpecker took off in a flash but came back a few minutes later with several of his buddies and said: “Look there what I did.”
    All to often we, like that little woodpecker, take credit for things that are truly acts of God.

  • Most Owen countians are familiar with the names of Claxon Ridge, Pink Ridge, Stewart Ridge, Buffalo Ridge, Riddle’s Ridge, Divided Ridge, Fortner Ridge, Ball Ridge, Harris Ridge, Bethel Ridge and Long Ridge. Some of these hilltops took on the names of the families who first settled along their crests, while the origin of the names of others may have been lost over the years.

  • It’s raining, again. We’ve had about three and a half inches over the past several days.
    The sun finally came out late Saturday afternoon and it was nice on Sunday afternoon but the rain has come back.
    I suddenly realized as the sun shone on my back yard that the forsythia hadn’t bloomed. There are tiny leaves appearing but no buds. Not a single bush in my large yard has bloomed.

  • “To look at the (news) paper is to raise a seashell to one’s ear and to be overwhelmed by the roar of humanity.”

    These words by Swiss author Alain de Botton described the undeniable influence a newspaper has upon its readers.
    Newspapers have been a part of our daily life for centuries. They were not only an avenue of advertisement and of distributing information to the public, but were also a means of providing entertainment through satire or storytelling.

  • Remember I told you I lost the last paragraph of Wanda’s news last week? Well, it popped up when I opened the computer on Tuesday morning. I don’t know where it went, nor how it came back but here it is.
    Wanda went to the wedding of Jessie and Doug Luscher’s daughter Sandi. They were old friends of Wanda and Danny’s when they went to Camp Pleasant Church years ago.

  • “Dillender hauled the mail in a covered freight wagon. On the trip to Eagle Station, he carried produce, poultry, animal skins, rabbits (in season) and sundry other farm products to the L & N depot for shipment to Louisville.
    On the return trip, he brought the day’s mail, staple and sundry stock for the stores and huge baskets of fresh bread, stacked in unwrapped loaves, a luxury directly related to Moxley’s close proximity to the railroad.”

  • This has been a very disjointed morning.
    I received Wanda’s news she had sent last night. I called Fay and talked to her and was getting ready to copy off Wanda’s email when she called to ask if I had received it.
    We talked a while and I went to the sun room to get a note I had made about a lady who had called in mid-week. I talked to Wanda and looked but the scrap of paper I had put Rosemary “Hawkins” Gaines’ name on was missing.

  • Author Marlene Parkin once wrote: “Quilts are masterpieces of the heart and windows into women’s history. They possess a magic that will never die, for all of life’s hopes and fears, loves and hates have been sewn into them.”
    Quilts are timeless. Crafted from bits and pieces of shirts, coats, overalls and dresses, they serve as palpable memories of the past.
    The origin of quilting is somewhat uncertain although the oldest example of patchwork is an Egyptian queen’s canopy dated around 960 B.C.

  • I must first begin with a clarification in last week’s column. I sent it in and then remembered I had skipped a paragraph of Wanda’s news. I sent Molly an email asking her to insert said paragraph, proceeded to type it as Wanda had sent it using “I” instead of Wanda’s name. I haven’t been in Georgetown in 10 years.

  • The sun came out, the snow disappeared and we got a lot done this week.
    John’s back improved and he called to say we could work on shelving on Wednesday.
    Teri came over to do her laundry and she helped too.
    The shelves are finished and loaded. They took everything I needed to store in plastic boxes with room to spare. The saw horses are gone, along with John’s tools.
    The big room in the basement is rearranged and back in living order.