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Today's Features

  • Poised near the road and surrounded by a tangled web of weeds, it has staunchly stood its ground for many years. Though the elements have claimed the porch roof, the remainder of its structure survived, and today, the Greenup one-room school continues to whisper stories of long ago.

    In 1821 the Kentucky State Legislature passed a public school act for elementary schools. Local taxation was expected to provide for schools, and though the act was not compulsory, it did become the foundation for Kentucky’s educational system.

  • BY ROGER ALFORD
    N-H Columnist

    The way I like to tell the story, Harold Wainscott was in a restaurant with his wife Betty Jo and their friends David and Mary Marlow while on a senior citizens’ trip to New York City.

    Billionaire Donald Trump was seated at a table across the room. Harold saw an opportunity to impress Betty Jo and the Marlows, his neighbors in Owenton, population 1,300.

  • How much would you pay to have your prayers answered?

    For the past four years, until the Seattle-based website with 1.3 million Facebook fans was taken down, people could pay the Christian Prayer Center between $9 and $35 to pray for them.

    From 2011 to 2015, more than 125,000 people forked over more than $7 million for their more than 400,000 transactions/prayer requests.

  • Monterey Baptist Church

    We celebrated Sunday morning with Brian and Tara Hawkins and their children Austin, Bailey, and Brayden as they officially joined our church family. Welcome Hawkins family!

    We wish Shirley Hardin a speedy recovery as she recovers from a mild stroke.

    There will be a church workday beginning at 9 a.m., Saturday, April 16. Lunch will be on your own.

  • In 1864 a Congressional Act set up the National Statuary Hall in Washington D.C. Each state contributed two statues of deceased citizens who had performed distinguished services.

    By 1929 all the states had sent statues, and the two from Kentucky included the famous Henry Clay and the little-known Dr. Ephraim McDowell.

    Many had never heard of this amazing doctor, who in the year 1809 performed a rare surgical procedure to remove a 22-pound ovarian tumor from a Green County woman.

  • A family of country bumpkins went to the city for the first time for a vacation.

    The man of the family and his son stood in the hotel lobby looking at an elevator. They’d never seen one before, and they were wondering what it was.

    That’s when a rather large and unattractive woman walked up to that elevator and pushed the button.

    The father and son watched her step inside and watched as the doors closed behind her.

    A minute or so later, they heard a ding. The elevator doors opened and beautiful young lady walked out.

  • Years ago when I did a lot of conference and retreat speaking, I was invited to speak at the annual Episcopal women’s diocesan meeting at the cathedral in downtown Orlando.

    A local Episcopalian woman who had suggested my name offered to take care of all the details for me. All I had to do was show up, which is what I do best.

  • Monterey Baptist Church

    What a glorious weekend as we celebrated the death and resurrection of our Lord. We were blessed to have the Rock Stars sing during the service.

    The men’s fellowship will be at 8 a.m., Saturday, April 2.

    There will be a church workday beginning at 9 a.m., Saturday, April 16. Lunch will be on your own.

    Rock Stars will meet at 7 p.m. on Wednesday. Bible study will also be at 7 p.m. in the fellowship hall. There is also a Bible study for the youth led by Shanna Osborne.

  • The constant movement of horses, wagons and immigrants, making their way across the Appalachian mountain chain into the wilderness of Kentucky, created visible paths from  previously indiscernible buffalo trails. However, it would take over 50 or more years before the mucky, muddy roads in Owen County became more navigable . Even then, Owen’s outlying communities found themselves quite isolated during the spring rains.

  • I’ve heard it said that a man’s worst difficulties begin when he is able to do as he like.

    If I could do whatever I like, I’d eat several massive cinnamon rolls every morning for breakfast, spend the day on my couch watching reruns of “Gilmore Girls,” punch a few people I know in the nose, never pay my taxes or dust my house.

    That’s just off the top of my head.

    Most of us think freedom is doing anything we want, making our own rules, not submitting to any type of authority – if it feels good, do it.