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Today's Features

  • I’ll start this morning with the news that didn’t make it last week. Wanda was staying with her mother and forgot her iPhone, so she had to call and dictate her information over the phone. I had already sent my news to Molly when she called again and added information. I must say that without Wanda covering the area, there wouldn’t be a Kay’s Branch News.
    My family and I are mostly “stay at homes” these days. We go to Frankfort to shop, and I play cards a couple of times a month, but that is it.

  • by Roger Alford

  • A few weeks ago, my pastor’s sermon made me squirm in my seat.
    We’ve been studying the Old Testament book of Exodus. That’s the book that talks about God rescuing the Israelites from their centuries of slavery in Egypt, all the plagues upon the Egyptians, how Moses parted the Red Sea and fed the Israelites with manna — honey-tasting bread from heaven.
    At one point, Moses meets with God on Mt. Sinai where God gives him two stone tablets with his law written on them.
    God’s law is a gift to his people, my pastor said.

  • First Baptist Owenton
    Our study of John continued with a message from chapter nine on One Man’s Treasure Another’s Tragedy. Sunday evening we studied Genesis nine and examined the Noahic Covenant.
    The volleyball league will have its tournament on March 27 and 28. First Baptist will have games on Thursday at 6:30 p.m., and Monday at 8:30 p.m.
    Our annual Easter Egg Hunt will be held on Sunday, April 9 after the late worship service. Candy can be donated now since we will fill eggs on Wednesday, March 29.

  • March 1, 2017

    Cattle Receipts: 202
    Last week: 701
    Last year: 788

    Compared to last week: Feeder steers sold steady, heifers under 600 lbs. $1-$2 higher, over 600 lbs. steady, slaughter cows steady, bulls $1-$2 higher, all on a light test due to heavy rains and muddy conditions.

    Feeders: 175
    Slaughter: 19
    Replacements: 8

  • By Steve Musen

  • by Jeneen Wiche

  • They were a common sight on most Owen County farms in the 19th and 20th centuries. Some were built below the ground, but it wasn’t unusual to see many on ground level with dirt mounded up to form a roof.
    Before the age of refrigeration and canning, root cellars were built under homes or in a separate structure on the property; and into the mid-1900s they played a vital role in American life.

  • First, I wish to apologize for the terrible grammar in one of my sentences last week. The computer has “spell check, ” but it knows nothing about grammar. I have got to start reading what I write before I send it to Molly. Miss Martha Holbrook and Miss Lena Watson are turning in their graves. The few who went to grade school and high school will know what I mean. Anyone who went through grade school and high school and had them for teachers had proper grammar pounded into their souls.