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Today's Features

  • BY JENEEN WICHE

    N-H Columnist

  • He was only 16, but a war was being fought, and in the 1860s his manhood was never questioned. He was born in Owenton, Ky., raised by his grandmother, and eventually was apprenticed as a cabinetmaker in Wheatley.
    When the Civil War touched Owen County, J.C. Hartsough joined the Confederate Army and became a soldier of the Orphan Brigade. Though Kentucky claimed neutrality at the beginning of the war, loyalties were divided throughout the state, and most Owen countians eventually chose to fight for the Southern cause.

  • Hay, hay and more hay — and I do mean the kind one feeds to the stock. Everybody in the area is rushing to get their hay cut, dried and baled before it rains. Ray got his cut and stored for the coming winter last week. Fay said they were planning to get theirs finished the first of this week. I have seen large rolls of hay on all the fields from Frankfort to Owenton. That’s about the only road I travel anymore.
    I got my hard mowed Saturday, so now we will have a drought. After all the rain we’ve had this spring, it’s bound to happen.

  • BY ROGER ALFORD

    N-H Columnist

  • If it’s true, as the proverb says, that “envy rots the bones,” then my bones are dust.
    Every once in a while, I hear from a certain friend whose life is perfect, or so I think.
    Just recently she posted on Facebook: “Well, we can cross a trip to Ireland off our list!! Had a fabulous vacation with all our wonderful kids, their spouses and our five — five!! — adorable grandbabies!!!”

  • Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church

  • He was perhaps best known for his stories of riverboat life on the Kentucky, but for decades Charlie Johnson preserved the history of Owen County in countless articles, which today give insight into our past.
    From river life to the Civil War to local lore, Charlie shared his vast knowledge of Owen County, its communities and the folks who settled its land.
    One of Johnson’s early articles, submitted to the News-Herald in the 1960s, described the rise and fall of Owen County toll roads, and the vital role they played in the development of the area.  

  • Sorry I didn’t write the column last week. I was very “down” over the death of Frank McDonald and just couldn’t think of anything to say.
    Everybody else was thinking about cutting hay. Should I or shouldn’t I. Most got faked out about the extended forecast and decided not and it would have been a great week for haying. You win some; you lose some. That’s farming.

  • Perhaps it was the letters written by her great-aunt Bea that inspired Marlene Browning-Wainscott to record stories of Owen County veterans. Aunt Bea had lost her husband in the war, and years later, her correspondence with Marlene provided a link to the past and a treasure of cherished memories
    Marlene Browning-Wainscott has devoted much of her life the past few years interviewing Owen countians who served in World War II. She felt an urgency to record the stories of these vital freedom-fighting Americans before they were lost.

  • The weather is finally starting to look like spring. Saturday was a beautiful day for mowing, pulling weeds and sprucing up the outdoors. John brought Liam down to play in my yard with Jessie and to play in the creek. There is very little water in the creek at the moment, only puddles here and there but just right for a 2 year old to manage.