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Today's Features

  • In Flanders fields the poppies blow
    Between the crosses, row on row,
    That mark our place; and in the sky
    The larks, still bravely singing, fly
    Scarce heard amid the guns below ...
       
    “In Flanders Field” is a poem written during World War I by doctor and Lt. Col. John McCrae.

  • Good morning.
    I said I was going to stop writing this column. I just didn’t have anything to say anymore, but several people have called and written to say how much it would be missed, and since I have no excuse except lack of inspiration, which you have now rekindled, I will try again.
    This was Derby week in Kentucky. I spent most of it mowing and managed to get all the different patches of grass gone over by the weekend.

  • Someone once said, “God pours life into death and death into life without a drop being spilled.”
    In rural Owen County, the loss of a loved one is accepted as part of everyday life.
    Author and storyteller Charlotte Ann Kemper Atchison described the days of mourning experienced by early Owen County families.
    Charlotte grew up on Bucks Run and wrote of the times in her childhood when a deceased family member was washed and dressed in his or her finest, and placed in the parlor for viewing.

  • Austin Edward Bourne was born April 23, 2013, at 1:50 p.m. in the Saint Elizabeth Family Birth Place. He weighed 8 pounds 3 ounces and was 20.5 inches long. He is the son of Ed and Courtney Bourne of Owenton. The maternal grandparents are Kenny and Terri French of Warsaw. His paternal grandfather is Malone Bourne.

  • Spring heralds not only the earth’s renewal of sprouting grasses, budding trees and blooming flowers, but during the early 1900s it also reminded Owen County mothers of the necessity to boost their children’s immune systems after the effects of winter.

  • Two weeks ago, as Ann and I were coming home, after the last terrible play at the Brown Theater, the landscape was still bare and very winter like, though the sun was shining.
    Suddenly at midweek, I noticed the forsythia bushes were in full bloom and lovely.
    The peony bushes were pushing through the ground and there were buds on the Bradford pears. The next morning they were in full bloom.
    Spring had come to the Branch.
    The grass turned green and started to grow, the red bud tree at the front of the house is now in full bloom.

  • The designs varied but the purpose was uniform – defense of the Kentucky railway system during the Civil War. Block houses which could hold up to 20 men were constructed by the Union along train tacks that traversed the Bluegrass.
    These were manned by federal soldiers whose job it was to thwart Confederate raids designed to interfere with northern supply routes.
    Author and historian Charles Bogart was the guest speaker last week at the historical society meeting, and using Power Point, he illustrated the construction of these fortifications.

  • When her 5-year-old son vanished from the backyard, Mrs. Bogart knew just where to find him. Perched on the platform that held the icehouse, Charles Bogart would be watching the Chesapeake and Ohio railroad trains chugging by. 
    The Bogarts lived in Newport and according to Charles, “There was nothing between us and the tracks.”

  • Perennial rose bushes grace either side of the monument; and for the past 90 years they have faithfully sent forth abundant blossoms. It is as if the rose bushes themselves acknowledge the great service rendered by the soldier whose remains rest beneath the ground under their outstretched roots.