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Today's Features

  • Perhaps you heard about the wife and husband who interrupted their vacation to go to the dentist.

    “I want a tooth pulled, and I don’t have time for Novocain,” the wife said. “I’m in a big hurry to get back to the beach. Just yank it out quickly, and we’ll be on our way.”

    Needless to say, the dentist was quite impressed.

    “You’re an incredibly brave woman,” he said. “Which tooth is it?”

  • Dear God,

    As you know, last Sunday morning I posted the following on Facebook:

    “Dear God,

    I’m trying to control the universe as best I can, but I think I’m failing at it. It might be time for me to step aside and let you take over – I hear you laughing! – but I’m not sure I know how to do that, seeing as I’ve been doing this for so long.

    So, please be patient with me and don’t smite me with boils or ugly hair.

    Thank you, NK”

  • Monterey Baptist Church

    Our congregation rejoiced as Richard and Brooke Lancaster were baptized in Cedar Creek following morning worship on Sunday, July 31.

    The MBC family mourns with Bro. Jeremy on the passing of his grandfather, Garnett Newton. Mr. Newton was known as “the Mayor of Baghdad.”

    “Promotion Sunday,” to recognize Sunday school promotions, will be held during morning worship on Aug. 14.

    The deacons will meet tonight (Wednesday) following adult Bible study.

  • Sydney Cobb was recently selected as the first place winner of the 2016 Kentucky Department of Agriculture Poster and Essay Contest.

    Cobb’s entry was selected as the most outstanding among entries from sixth graders across the Commonwealth, representing this year’s theme, “Kentucky Agriculture: Our Farms, Our Food, Our Future.”

  • BY EMILY BURFORD
    Special to the News-Herald

    The Bethany School annual get-together was held Saturday, July 9, at Noble Restaurant at Corinth. A total of 19 people showed up for the event, a good time was had.

    Those attending were Elizabeth Dunavent, Linda Clifton Allnutt, Lois Mefford Skirvin, Jim and Betty Lawrence, Geneva Seale, Melvin Mason, Donald Crupper, Jimmy Rose, Ernest (Buck) Smith and Sara, Naomi Shivers, Jean Murphy, Duard and Ann Glass, Victor and Judy Wagenschein, Frank and Emily Burford.

  • BY LARRY KARSNER
    Director, Owen County Emergency Management

    Heat kills by pushing the human body beyond its limits. In extreme heat and high humidity, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature.

    Most heat disorders occur because the victim has been overexposed to heat or has over-exercised for his or her age and physical condition. Older adults, young children, and those who are sick or overweight are more likely to succumb to extreme heat.

  • BY JENEEN WICHE
    Weekend Gardener

    Swallow Rail was the name my Dad gave the farm more than 30 years ago. He wanted it to be relevant, reflecting the spatial and natural qualities of his 18 acres in western Shelby County. His inspiration came from the swallows that swoop and swerve so adeptly in open fields, catching insects on the fly. The rail of Swallow Rail comes from the two railroad tracks that flank either end of the road.

  • The fisheries division of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources will hold a public meeting on Thursday, Aug. 18 at 6:30 p.m. at the Owen County Agricultural Extension office at 265 Ellis Highway in Owenton.

  • Monterey Baptist Church

    Adult Bible study meets at 7 p.m. on Wednesdays.

    We will have a Back to School bash from 6-8 p.m. tonight (Wednesday). We will have a water gun fight filled with colored water, so wear a white shirt! We will serve pizza and popsicles, too!

    Men’s fellowship will be at 8 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 6.

    The monthly planning meeting will be at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 16. Everyone is encouraged to attend.

  • Early Kentucky settlers had little time to socialize. The arduous work of building cabins in the wilderness, providing food for their families and battling Indians and the elements provided limited opportunities for quilting bees, rifle frolics and square dances.

    By the middle 1800s communities had sprung up in the Owen County area, and churches were formed to provide folks a place to hear the Word of God. Church gatherings also gave countians the opportunity to socialize with neighbors and friends.