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Today's Features

  • On Tuesday, May 10, the Owen County High School Band, Choir and Winter Guard held their annual year end/senior banquet. A total of 12 senior band members celebrated their accomplishments, along with 11 senior choir members and two senior winter guard members.

    A buffet and desserts were enjoyed by those in attendance.

  • Perhaps it was nostalgia that bound the people together, or maybe it was the innumerable reminisces, recounted by the elegant white-haired figure standing before them, that linked them to the past.

    Thelma Olds Gibson was the special guest speaker at the historical society meeting last week, and she captured the audience with poignant and sometimes hilariously funny episodes of her school days that led up to her graduation in 1952.

  • When my oldest daughter was 4 or 5 we were riding with my mom and Alison blurted out, “Grandma, want to know a family secret?”

    I sat in the passenger seat frozen, not sure what my daughter was about to say.

    “It’s like Dad wearing Mom’s underwear,” Alison said.

    It was one of those moments when you feel obligated to explain, but you sure as heck don’t want to because no matter what you say your mom will still think you’re an imbecile -- or worse.

  • BY ROGER ALFORD
    N-H Columnist

    Dreaming of lives filled with excitement, three good ol’ boys decided to apply to become police officers. Part of the interview process involved an exercise in observation, led by a rather ill-tempered sergeant.

    The sergeant held up a photograph of a suspect for 5 second, put it away, and then asked the first of the fellows what he observed about the suspect that would help to apprehend him.

    “That’s easy,” the fellow said. “He had only one eye.”

  • Cedar Hill Baptist Church

    We enjoyed hearing about the past and upcoming trips to Haiti from Ben Allen.  After services we had a fantastic lunch as a fundraiser for Ben and Ashley’s trip to Haiti.  We are praying for their safety and God’s will to be done as this group travels there this summer.

    Bro. Bill’s message was from Psalms 1, entitled “The Truth, Now What?”  This Psalm is clear that if we don’t seek God daily we are settling for less than what He has planned for us.

  • His stooped figure was a familiar sight among the hills of Owen County in the early 1900s. At times he would exit the road and stroll through fields to visit an isolated family. His age was unknown, but his deeply-lined weathered face acknowledged years of exposure to the elements.

    Two heavily-laden packs settled themselves comfortably on his shoulders and boasted of small necessities, along with a few frivolities that brought pleasure to young and old alike.

  • Cedar Hill Baptist

    A wonderful message was shared Sunday from 2 Samuel 5:17-25.  In all things we need to go to our stronghold and inquire of the Lord.

    ARC only has two meetings left. Hope to see everyone at 6 p.m. tonight as we continue to learn more about Christ. If you need a ride call 484-5236 or 514-1594.

    Our VBS will be June 13-17. Contact FaDana if you are willing and able to help.

    Set aside August 13 on your calendar for a very special event that will take place at the fairgrounds.  More information soon!

  • When Michelle Smith talks about God, tears trickle down her cheeks.

    A 13th-generation native Floridian, she is selling or giving away all of her possessions to move to the Congo in central Africa, one of the most volatile areas on the planet.

    She will be joining a small handful of other people who feel called by God to “come and die,” as Michelle says, for the sake of the gospel of peace.

  • BY ROGER ALFORD
    N-H Columnist

    I enjoyed the tale about the elderly woman who called 911 to report her car had been broken into. She was hysterical, telling the person on the other end of the phone line: “They stole the radio, the steering wheel, the brake, the gas pedal, even the gear shift.”

    A few minutes later, a police officer radioed in: “Disregard. She had gotten into the backseat by mistake.”

  • In early Kentucky they were found in the widely-scattered frontier cabins. As towns sprang up, they congregated at trading posts and taverns. By the 19th and 20th centuries, they patronized the local general stores, and as communities expanded, storytelling became a delightful pastime for folks who were hungry to escape the hum-drum of everyday life.