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Today's Features

  • BY STEVE MUSEN
    Owen Extension Agent for Agriculture and Natural Resources

    With summer rapidly approaching, farm work is under way in earnest and that often means moving equipment along Kentucky’s roadways. Collisions on public roadways involving farm machinery take place each year especially during the busy spring planting and fall harvest times.  Thus, people driving farm machinery and motor vehicles need to be especially careful and watchful in the days ahead.

  • BY JENEEN WICHE
    Weekend Gardener

    I have no complaints about plant performance this spring. But, it seems some gardeners are still stumped by their under-performing plants. Why plants fail to thrive is a hard question to answer, of course, because a great many things factor into poor performance, lack of bloom or die back.

  • BY JUDY HETTERMAN
    Owen Extension Agent for Family and Consumer Sciences

    According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, over 180,000 ladder-related injuries get treated in hospital emergency departments each year. Here are important procedures to follow to prevent injuries when using ladders.

  • Mother’s Day wasn’t the prettiest day I have ever seen, but it was one of my best.

    All my children came to church with me. Teri, her husband Ray, Ann, John and Charity, Teri’s daughter Rachel and her three children Allie, Sean and Caitlin. We filled two pews.

    Joyce Claxon beat me as “oldest mother,” but I had the most children there. Joyce, Wanda’s mother, was oldest mother and mother with the most children at Old Cedar. Wanda, Barbara, Noel and Ray went to church with her.

  • Baby at two months: Smiles at people; can briefly calm him or herself (brings hands to mouth and suck on hand); tires to look at adult caregiver; coos, makes babbling noises; turns head toward sounds; pays attention to faces; begins to follow things with eyes; begins to act bored (cries, fussy) if activity doesn’t change; can hold head up; makes movements with arms and legs.

  • Owen County 4-H held its 69th Annual Fashion Revue and Variety Show April 29 at the Owen County Extension Office.

    Eighteen sewers modeled the garments and bags they worked so hard on throughout the spring, though a total of 25 youth completed sewing projects. The sewing season would not have been a success without the help of the many ladies who volunteered their time and expertise.

    All participants received blue Danish ribbons this year, indicating excellent quality in both garment construction and modeling.

  • BY STEVE MUSEN
    Owen Extension Agent for Agriculture and Natural Resources

    It is a good time to think about pest control for your home vegetable garden.

    You can control pest problems, and perhaps prevent future difficulties, in your garden by doing some advance planning and following a few simple Integrated Pest Management practices. IPM promotes minimal pesticide use and emphasizes the use of all available pest control methods including cultural, mechanical and biological practices to prevent pest problems.

  • BY JENEEN WICHE
    Weekend Gardener

    The most common form of plant propagation is digging and dividing which is best done in early spring before new growth or in the fall before plants go dormant. Digging and dividing is great for herbaceous plants but those plants that are considered woody ornamentals do not divide as easily with a spade. In this case we can look to the technique of rooting out softwood cuttings from the mother plant.

  • The predominant news in the Branch this week is rain.

    I have become fascinated with the channel 27’s weather map. The storms block out DirecTV, so I turn to the weather map and watch the red and yellow blobs moving slowly across the Franklin County line and into my little area of Owen. You can tell I lead an exciting life.

  • On Wednesday, April 6, the 2016 Leadership Owen County class participants had the opportunity to expand their knowledge regarding healthcare availability in Owen County.

    They spent the day listening to healthcare professionals present information on their particular areas of expertise and visiting some of the facilities in the community.

    Diane Coleman, of Three Rivers District Health Department, provided a wealth of information regarding the multifaceted services they provide.