.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • Morgan’s presence touched the soul of the people.
    He was a folk hero of the South and won the admiration of many as he wrought havoc upon the Union Army. He was a master of guerilla warfare and against overwhelming odds John Hunt Morgan left an indelible mark upon the hearts of a nation.

  • She knew her heart was weak, and that if she bore another child the stress of labor might prove fatal.
    In June of 1925, this young Owen County woman’s heart gave out as she attempted  to deliver her fourth child; and Mattie Agnes Smith Karsner and her unborn baby were buried together on the gentle rolling slope of Monterey cemetery.

  • This has been a slow week. I needed one after the departure of my cousins. They arrived back in Missouri safely. I have spent the week changing beds and doing laundry, and sitting in my chair in the sunroom with Dobbs. We were both exhausted.
    I did get to Frankfort on Wednesday to empty the recyclables. My soft drink can was overflowing. Friday was Hand and Foot day. We played at Barbara Hecker’s house this month. That was a lot of fun. I am back into my routine this week.

  • Deep within a forest, a little turtle began to climb a tree. After hours of effort, he reached the top, jumped into the air waving his front legs, and crashed to the ground.
    After recovering, he slowly climbed the tree again, jumped, and fell to the ground.
    The turtle tried time and again while a couple of birds sat on a branch and watched him.
    Finally, the female bird turned to her mate and said: “Dear, don’t you think it’s time we tell him he’s adopted?”

  • Allison Marie Moller, the daughter of William and Jessica Moller of Glencoe, will be united in marriage with Blake Alexander Wolford, the son of Darren and Chris Wolford of Owenton, on Oct. 18, 2014, at 11 a.m. in the Remnant Baptist Church.
    The service will be officiated by Bro. Darren Wolford.
    Allison Marie Moller will be given away by her father.
    The bride is a 2013 graduate of Gallatin County High School and is currently employed by Dollar General.

  • An old man on a moped pulls up next to a young fellow in a Corvette at a stoplight.
    “What kind of car you got there?” the old guy asks, his thumbs tucked into his suspenders.
    “It’s a 2014 Corvette, special made,” the young fellow boasted. “It cost me nearly $80,000.”
    The old fellow leaned in and took a look. He saw the stick shift on the floor, the stylish steering wheel, and the speedometer that registered over 200 mph.
    “Mighty nice,” the old man said.

  • A chicken in every pot and a car in every garage.

  • “Lord willing and the creek don’t rise.”
    This was a common phrase used by folks in Kentucky. It referred to the belief that the Lord was in charge, and barring unforeseen circumstances such as rising creek waters, one would go ahead with their plans.
    This adage was particularly applicable to early settlers in Owen County who made their homes near the numerous creeks in the area.
    When heavy rains flooded the waterways, most folks were unable to cross at the creek fords and travel came to a standstill.

  • Ahhhh! I’m late.
    I am suffering from company-lag this morning. My cousins from Missouri and Savoy, Illinois came last Monday evening and left this morning at 7 a.m.
    I was up at 5:45 a.m. to cook breakfast and help them find their stuff, finish packing and load their van.
    Dobbs and I went to the sunroom to sit down and listen to the quiet and went back to sleep. I finally stirred myself and came to the kitchen and start a load of towels and wash the dishes, when it suddenly dawned on me – This is Monday and I should have the column in by now.

  • Buffalo traces wound through dense forests leading settlers to a new land. The proximity to the Kentucky River, an abundance of clear creeks and the rolling hills of Owen County gave promise to these early pioneers of an agrarian paradise.
    The area known today as Lusby’s Mill appealed to the Cobb, Clifton, Perkins and Osborne families and they were among the first to create a thriving Owen County community in the 1790s.