.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • The organization of thriving communities is characterized by the mobilization of its volunteers. For the past 100 years, the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service has been successful in recruiting, developing and retaining high quality volunteers of all ages.

  • Today the scope of the landscape has changed. The few remaining large family farms stand as sentinels serenely as Canby grows, offering newcomers a chance to settle amid the rolling hills of Owen County.
    Sylvia Perkins is a lot like Canby. She has lived in the community most of her life; and though age has slowed her a bit, her steadfast presence remains as an unmoving witness to the ageless nobility of land and people.

  • It’s 29 degrees on the Branch this morning, but the weatherman says we’ll have a couple more days of pleasant weather before the bottom drops out of the thermometer.

  • Monterey Baptist
    It was a privilege to recognize the veterans in our congregation today.  As the military medley played, the men stood while their branch’s song was being played.  
    Our deepest gratitude to Jim Bob Cook (Air Force), Joe Peters (Army), Gary Derringer (Army), Foster Smith (Army) and Melvin Miller (Army). We should never forget the sacrifice the men and women (past and present) have made so we could worship freely. May God bless you.   

  • Morgan’s presence touched the soul of the people.
    He was a folk hero of the South and won the admiration of many as he wrought havoc upon the Union Army. He was a master of guerilla warfare and against overwhelming odds John Hunt Morgan left an indelible mark upon the hearts of a nation.

  • She knew her heart was weak, and that if she bore another child the stress of labor might prove fatal.
    In June of 1925, this young Owen County woman’s heart gave out as she attempted  to deliver her fourth child; and Mattie Agnes Smith Karsner and her unborn baby were buried together on the gentle rolling slope of Monterey cemetery.

  • This has been a slow week. I needed one after the departure of my cousins. They arrived back in Missouri safely. I have spent the week changing beds and doing laundry, and sitting in my chair in the sunroom with Dobbs. We were both exhausted.
    I did get to Frankfort on Wednesday to empty the recyclables. My soft drink can was overflowing. Friday was Hand and Foot day. We played at Barbara Hecker’s house this month. That was a lot of fun. I am back into my routine this week.

  • Deep within a forest, a little turtle began to climb a tree. After hours of effort, he reached the top, jumped into the air waving his front legs, and crashed to the ground.
    After recovering, he slowly climbed the tree again, jumped, and fell to the ground.
    The turtle tried time and again while a couple of birds sat on a branch and watched him.
    Finally, the female bird turned to her mate and said: “Dear, don’t you think it’s time we tell him he’s adopted?”

  • Allison Marie Moller, the daughter of William and Jessica Moller of Glencoe, will be united in marriage with Blake Alexander Wolford, the son of Darren and Chris Wolford of Owenton, on Oct. 18, 2014, at 11 a.m. in the Remnant Baptist Church.
    The service will be officiated by Bro. Darren Wolford.
    Allison Marie Moller will be given away by her father.
    The bride is a 2013 graduate of Gallatin County High School and is currently employed by Dollar General.

  • An old man on a moped pulls up next to a young fellow in a Corvette at a stoplight.
    “What kind of car you got there?” the old guy asks, his thumbs tucked into his suspenders.
    “It’s a 2014 Corvette, special made,” the young fellow boasted. “It cost me nearly $80,000.”
    The old fellow leaned in and took a look. He saw the stick shift on the floor, the stylish steering wheel, and the speedometer that registered over 200 mph.
    “Mighty nice,” the old man said.